Space Archaeologist Sarah Parcak Sarah Parcak explains how she uses satellite imagery and data to solve one of the biggest challenges in archaeology: where to start digging. Her book is called 'Archaeology From Space: How The Future Shapes Our Past'. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Archaeology...From Space

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Archaeology...From Space

Archaeology...From Space

Archaeology...From Space

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/795966329/799017457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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British archaeologists work, on October 2, 2009, at the ruins of an arena built early in the third century BC outside Ostia, the ancient imperial port near Rome. Sarah Parcak's work using satellite imagery and data led to the discovery of the site. Vincenzo Pinto/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Vincenzo Pinto/AFP via Getty Images

British archaeologists work, on October 2, 2009, at the ruins of an arena built early in the third century BC outside Ostia, the ancient imperial port near Rome. Sarah Parcak's work using satellite imagery and data led to the discovery of the site.

Vincenzo Pinto/AFP via Getty Images

Sarah Parcak explains how she uses satellite imagery and data to solve one of the biggest challenges in archaeology: where to start digging. Her book is called 'Archaeology From Space: How The Future Shapes Our Past'. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.