Calling The Shots In The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife : 1A "When we have less acute conditions, most of the public can get care quickly and economically," one of our guests says. "Clinics are an important part of addressing that, but nurses can provide a variety of primary care."

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Calling The Shots In The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife

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Calling The Shots In The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife

1A

Calling The Shots In The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife

Calling The Shots In The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/796310015/796317563" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Madison Tolchin visits Paula Glass, an advanced registered nurse practitioner, for a health checkup at a Planned Parenthood clinic on April 14, 2017 in Wellington, Florida. Joe Raedle/JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES hide caption

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Joe Raedle/JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES

Madison Tolchin visits Paula Glass, an advanced registered nurse practitioner, for a health checkup at a Planned Parenthood clinic on April 14, 2017 in Wellington, Florida.

Joe Raedle/JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES

The World Health Organization has declared 2020 the year of the nurse and midwife. These professionals endure long shifts, are often on their feet all day, and are the first line of defense for many patients. And they are everywhere in the healthcare landscape.

Modern nursing is a long way from the stereotype. Forget about the white apron and hat. Today, nurses practice more and more complex medicine in a changing health system that needs their help. In many communities, when you get sick, you're as likely these days to see a nurse as you are a doctor.

Ernest Grant, President of the American Nurses Association; and Pamela Cipriano, First Vice President of the International Council of Nurses joined us to talk about it.

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