A Bag of Bolívares: And Other Indicators From Venezuela : Planet Money Venezuela started 2019 with rolling blackouts, hyperinflation, and crippling food shortages. Things have actually gotten a little better, mostly thanks to the economic innovations of everyday people.
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A Bag of Bolívares: And Other Indicators From Venezuela

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A Bag of Bolívares: And Other Indicators From Venezuela

A Bag of Bolívares: And Other Indicators From Venezuela

A Bag of Bolívares: And Other Indicators From Venezuela

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/797409100/797459102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Economist Gabriela Saade (left) presents Stacey Vanek Smith with a purse made entirely out of Venezuelan bolívares. Leena Sanzgiri/NPR hide caption

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Leena Sanzgiri/NPR

Economist Gabriela Saade (left) presents Stacey Vanek Smith with a purse made entirely out of Venezuelan bolívares.

Leena Sanzgiri/NPR

2019 was shaping up to be another horrific year for Venezuela. For the last five years, the country has been in a kind of economic death spiral. In fact, 2019 started out with nationwide blackouts, crippling inflation, food shortages and one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world.

But things have stabilized a little bit over the last year. According to Venezuelan economist, Gabriela Saade, the reason has little to do with the country's authoritarian regime and everything to do with the innovation and resilient spirit of everyday citizens.

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