Proof That A Good Sandwich Knows No Borders Using latitude and longitude 2 men, one in New Zealand and one in Spain, created an earth sandwich. The BBC reports they placed bread on precise points on either side of the planet at the same time.
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Proof That A Good Sandwich Knows No Borders

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Proof That A Good Sandwich Knows No Borders

Proof That A Good Sandwich Knows No Borders

Proof That A Good Sandwich Knows No Borders

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Using latitude and longitude 2 men, one in New Zealand and one in Spain, created an earth sandwich. The BBC reports they placed bread on precise points on either side of the planet at the same time.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. With two slices of bread, you can make a sandwich out of just about anything. So two men, one in New Zealand and one in Spain, decided to make one out of everything. Using latitude and longitude, sandwich dudes Etienne Naude and Angel Sierra coordinated an Earth sandwich. The idea isn't exactly new, but the BBC reports not all examples have been bona fide opposite-point endeavors. Just further proof a good sandwich knows no borders.

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