Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women? : Planet Money On average, work by women artists sells for 40% less than work by male artists. Their work also represents just a small sliver of what's displayed in museums. So, how did women get shut out of the art world?
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Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women?

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Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women?

Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women?

Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798248159/798251458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Visitors in the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Germany view the painting Edrita Fried 1981 by Joan Mitchell. This was part of the 2015 exhibition Joan Mitchell. Retrospective. Her Life and Paintings. Henning Kaiser/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Henning Kaiser/picture alliance via Getty Images

Visitors in the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Germany view the painting Edrita Fried 1981 by Joan Mitchell. This was part of the 2015 exhibition Joan Mitchell. Retrospective. Her Life and Paintings.

Henning Kaiser/picture alliance via Getty Images

Art by women and men is valued differently. If a viewer thinks a painting was done by a woman, they say they like the painting less. This gender bias has real consequences for female artists - on average, artwork by women sells for 40% less than works by men. And far less work by women is displayed in major museums around the country than work by men.

On today's show, we explore how the art world - an industry that prides itself on progressive, even radical thinking - still has a long way to go to achieve gender parity. And we bust some big myths about women artists, including why you may never have heard of the artist Joan Mitchell.

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Correction Jan. 22, 2020

In the original version of this episode, we incorrectly said that the Baltimore Museum of Art will be opening its Joan Mitchell exhibition this April. The exhibition is actually scheduled to open this September.