A Language With Chutzpah: Yiddish And American Culture : 1A Yiddish has been featured in pop culture from Mel Brooks in the '70s to more recently in The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. "Yiddish is a part of American life, and people don't want to lose that," says Yiddish expert Josh Lambert.

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A Language With Chutzpah: Yiddish And American Culture

A Language With Chutzpah: Yiddish And American Culture

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Shows like 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' have kept Yiddish in the spotlight. Philippe Antonello/PHILIPPE ANTONELLO hide caption

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Philippe Antonello/PHILIPPE ANTONELLO

Shows like 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' have kept Yiddish in the spotlight.

Philippe Antonello/PHILIPPE ANTONELLO

When was the last time you ate a bagel? Gave a spiel at work? Called someone a klutz? Tried to have chutzpah? Contacted Apple about an iPhone glitch?

These may feel like quintessential examples of being a modern American, but the keywords behind them aren't: they're Yiddish.

The Jewish people began speaking Yiddish over a thousand years ago in Eastern Europe. But after a century and a half of immigration to the U.S. and elsewhere, the cultural reach of the language is vast.

These days, most everyone – including goys – feel some connection to Yiddish.

Joining us now to discuss the comeback of Yiddish in America are Ilan Stavans and Josh Lambert, co-editors of the book, "How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish."

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