Buddhists, Sociopaths And The Art Of Investing : The Indicator from Planet Money There's been a lot of troubling economic and political news over the last few years. In spite of that, the stock market has just kept on climbing.

Buddhists, Sociopaths And The Art Of Investing

Buddhists, Sociopaths And The Art Of Investing

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They call it the Wall of Worry. It's the tsunami of negative news that we've been swamped with over the last four years. Trade wars, tension with North Korea and Iran, rising corporate debt levels, fires, floods, power outages and wild, wild winters. Sometimes it feels as though we're teetering on the edge of political, economic and even existential disaster. And yet, despite all of that, the stock market just keeps on climbing.

Stocks are, of course, a projection: they rise because people buy them believing they're going to be more valuable in the future than they are today. But how can anyone think the future looks bright when the present appears so blighted? How is it that stocks are able to claw their way up this Wall of Worry? We talk with Michael Batnick of Ritholtz Wealth Management about what it is that's making this market tick, against all the odds.

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