Scientists Recreate Vocal Tract Of Egyptian Priest Nesyamun Nesyamun died about 3,000 years ago but archaeologist John Schofield and others used CT scans, 3-D printing and an electronic larynx to recreate a part of the voice of the mummy.
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Scientists Recreate Vocal Tract Of Egyptian Priest Nesyamun

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Scientists Recreate Vocal Tract Of Egyptian Priest Nesyamun

Scientists Recreate Vocal Tract Of Egyptian Priest Nesyamun

Scientists Recreate Vocal Tract Of Egyptian Priest Nesyamun

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/799163513/799163514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Nesyamun died about 3,000 years ago but archaeologist John Schofield and others used CT scans, 3-D printing and an electronic larynx to recreate a part of the voice of the mummy.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Scientists have recreated the vocal tract of an Egyptian priest. His name was Nesyamun. He died about 3,000 years ago. But archaeologist John Schofield and others used CT scans, 3D printing and an electronic larynx to resurrect the mummy's voice - a full second of it, anyway. Schofield says, we think that hearing a voice from so long ago will be an unforgettable experience. So drum roll please.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

COMPUTER-GENERATED VOICE: (Vocalizing).

GREENE: That was it. OK.

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