'Baby Shark,' Now In 19 Languages And Counting — Including A Navajo Tongue Star Wars has been translated into a Navajo language, and now the viral song sensation "Baby Shark" gets the treatment as language preservationists seek to keep the ancient native tongue Diné in use.
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'Baby Shark,' Now In 19 Languages And Counting — Including A Navajo Tongue

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'Baby Shark,' Now In 19 Languages And Counting — Including A Navajo Tongue

'Baby Shark,' Now In 19 Languages And Counting — Including A Navajo Tongue

'Baby Shark,' Now In 19 Languages And Counting — Including A Navajo Tongue

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/800557518/800559468" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Star Wars has been translated into a Navajo language, and now the viral song sensation "Baby Shark" gets the treatment as language preservationists seek to keep the ancient native tongue Diné in use. KNAU's Zac Ziegler reports.