Man Cited For Not Using A Hands-Free Cellphone Device A man in Australia was recently pulled over for talking on his cellphone while riding a horse. He pleaded guilty because, he conceded, the horse was in motion. A judge dismissed the case.
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Man Cited For Not Using A Hands-Free Cellphone Device

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Man Cited For Not Using A Hands-Free Cellphone Device

Man Cited For Not Using A Hands-Free Cellphone Device

Man Cited For Not Using A Hands-Free Cellphone Device

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/801496456/801496457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A man in Australia was recently pulled over for talking on his cellphone while riding a horse. He pleaded guilty because, he conceded, the horse was in motion. A judge dismissed the case.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Driving with both hands on the wheel is common sense. In a lot of places, you can be cited for using your phone while driving if it's not a hands-free device. A man in rural New South Wales, Australia, was recently pulled over for talking on his cellphone while riding a horse. He pleaded guilty because he conceded the horse was in motion, but a judge called the matter trivial and dismissed it without a conviction.

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