Panel Questions The mummy's mum no more.
NPR logo

Panel Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/801838595/801847782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/801838595/801847782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mummy's mum no more.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Panelists, this week - this is all - for all of you - this week, British scientists recreated what a 3,000-year-old Egyptian mummy's voice would have sounded like when he was alive. Now, before we play it for you, we're going to ask each of you to replicate the voice of a mummy.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Whoever gets closest to the real thing gets a point. We'll start with the Maz - your best mummy.

MAZ JOBRANI: (Imitating mummy) Oy, so good to be here in this pyramid.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Very good. Very good.

SAGAL: Faith.

FAITH SALIE: (Imitating mummy) Oh, mighty Isis.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: What?

SAGAL: And Josh.

JOSH GONDELMAN: I got a thing on my nose. Could somebody scratch that for me?

(LAUGHTER)

GONDELMAN: I can't lift my hands.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right. Very good. Very good. And now, here is the actual sound as recreated of an Egyptian mummy in life.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

COMPUTER-GENERATED VOICE: (Vocalizing).

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Wait a minute.

SALIE: What?

SAGAL: I know. It was a little hard to take in all at once. Let's hear it again.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

COMPUTER-GENERATED VOICE: (Vocalizing).

SAGAL: That's it.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: What?

SAGAL: So who do you think? Who do you think, Bill? - kind of closest.

(LAUGHTER)

BILL KURTIS: I'm going to go with Maz.

SAGAL: Yeah, I think Maz.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Scientists at the University of London created a 3D-printed version of a mummified Egyptian priest's mouth and throat. They combined it with an electronic larynx to reconstruct the sound of his voice as it must have heard. Or they just bought a kazoo.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It does kind of change the image of mummies. Imagine, you know, you're an archaeologist in the '20s, and you break into a cursed tomb, and the mummy rises up from his sarcophagus and goes, (vocalizing).

(LAUGHTER)

GONDELMAN: What was Brendan Fraser so scared of?

SAGAL: I don't know.

JOBRANI: What are your thoughts on the pharaoh? Eh.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: Eh.

SAGAL: Eh.

GONDELMAN: Eh.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

COMPUTER-GENERATED VOICE: (Vocalizing).

SAGAL: Who knew they were Jewish?

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Eh. Eh.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BAD GUY")

BILLIE EILISH: (Singing) Make your mama sad type, make your girlfriend mad tight, might seduce your dad type. I'm the bad guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

COMPUTER-GENERATED VOICE: Eh.

SAGAL: Coming up, we're looking at the man in the mirror. It's our Bluff The Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Maz Jobrani, Faith Salie and Josh Gondelman. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

SAGAL: Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you so much. Right now, you know it - it's time for the WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME Bluff The Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play our game in the air.

Copyright © 2020 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.