Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve : Planet Money How do you measure happiness? Economist David Blanchflower says age has a lot to do with it.
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Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve

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Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve

Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve

Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve

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  • Transcript

A happy David Blanchflower after catching a big fish. Blake Matherly /David Blanchflower hide caption

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Blake Matherly /David Blanchflower

A happy David Blanchflower after catching a big fish.

Blake Matherly /David Blanchflower

David Blanchflower set out to determine what makes people happy. He surveyed people all over the world, from a variety of different backgrounds, and found that very young people and very old people tended to be the happiest, with a noticeable dip in the middle. On today's show David shares the exact age that happiness bottoms out – the age at which people reach their peak misery.

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