Senate Impeachment Trial Ends: Voters React To Trump's Acquittal The Senate on Wednesday acquitted President Trump on two articles of impeachment that were filed by the House. Voters across the country react to the president's acquittal.
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Senate Impeachment Trial Ends: Voters React To Trump's Acquittal

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Senate Impeachment Trial Ends: Voters React To Trump's Acquittal

Senate Impeachment Trial Ends: Voters React To Trump's Acquittal

Senate Impeachment Trial Ends: Voters React To Trump's Acquittal

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/803291999/803292000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Senate on Wednesday acquitted President Trump on two articles of impeachment that were filed by the House. Voters across the country react to the president's acquittal.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

What do you think of the impeachment and trial that are now over? We expect to hear from the defendant today. President Trump makes a statement on his acquittal at noon Eastern Time. We have been asking voters, including Al Nowakowski (ph) in Los Angeles.

AL NOWAKOWSKI: It was a fine dog and pony show, a complete waste of money, but I'm sure it will invigorate his base and make the rest of the electorate yawn, you know.

NOEL KING, HOST:

We found Patricia Studie (ph) outside a Walmart in Loveland, Colo. She's a beautician. She says she supports the president and wants Congress to change its priorities.

PATRICIA STUDIE: They're going to have to really stand up and focus on the people instead of on the negativity of Trump. You know, people get sick and tired of hearing about it. We want to hear, what are they going to do for this country?

KING: And then outside that same Walmart, Marlene Morris (ph) said she hasn't been able to pay that much attention to the trial.

MARLENE MORRIS: Honestly, I was more focused on trying to look for work than impeachment proceedings.

INSKEEP: Gabriel Enrikes (ph) was much more intently focused. He's a sophomore at West Los Angeles College, and said the outcome left him disappointed.

GABRIEL ENRIKES: I feel almost betrayed. I feel like everything that I've learned as a political science major and as a U.S. citizen has been a lie because I do feel that President Trump did something wrong, and I feel like he went unpunished. So it's made me really question how seriously we actually take the Constitution and the office of the president.

KING: We also met two friends at a cigar bar in Lancaster, Pa. They are Jeff Shoaf (ph) and Art Mellinger (ph).

JEFF SHOAF: I don't know why they want a corrupt, lying, cheating son of a gun like that in office, but...

ART MELLINGER: He was never guilty in the first place. They just can't - no, you're done. Yep, you're quiet now. He's done more for the economy. He's done more for the military. He's done more for the trades.

KING: Their view of the president might be different, but after his acquittal, they agree on one thing.

SHOAF: Oh, he's definitely going to be voted back in.

MELLINGER: Yeah.

INSKEEP: That's what some Americans said on the day the Senate acquitted the president on charges that he abused his power and obstructed Congress.

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