Coronavirus And The Global Economy : Planet Money The coronavirus has sickened more than 40,000 people and killed more than 900. In addition to that devastating human toll, the outbreak is likely to have economically destructive effects as well.
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Coronavirus And The Global Economy

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Coronavirus And The Global Economy

Coronavirus And The Global Economy

Coronavirus And The Global Economy

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
BANGKOK - FEBRUARY 10 : As Coronavirus spreads travelers arriving and departing wear masks at Suvarnabhumi International airport in Bangkok, Thailand (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images )
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

With more than 40,000 reported cases in at least 25 countries, the outbreak of coronavirus that started late last year in China's Hubei province has become a devastating global health emergency. With tens of millions of people under lockdown and travel to and from China heavily restricted, the outbreak is likely to have far-reaching consequences for the global economy as well. In a new report, Moody's Analytics Chief Economist Mark Zandi assesses the possible economic damage, from copper mines in Chile to car factories in the U.S.

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