Are Cats Really Aloof? It's the latest installment of our series, "Animal Slander," where we take a common phrase about animals and see what truth there is to it. The issue before the Short Wave court today: "Do cats deserve their aloof reputation?" We look at the evidence with cat researcher, Kristyn Vitale of Oregon State University. Follow Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia and Emily Kwong @emilykwong1234. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Does Your Cat Really Hate You?

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Does Your Cat Really Hate You?

Does Your Cat Really Hate You?

Does Your Cat Really Hate You?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/804955209/805031647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zoe, a 14 year-old European cat, poses in the animal shelter of a SPA. OLIVIER MORIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER MORIN/AFP via Getty Images

Zoe, a 14 year-old European cat, poses in the animal shelter of a SPA.

OLIVIER MORIN/AFP via Getty Images

It's the latest installment of our series, "Animal Slander," where we take a common phrase about animals and see what truth there is to it. The case before the Short Wave court today: cats. Many people say they're aloof, especially compared to dogs, that they love food more than their owners and that cats like people who ignore them.

We look at the evidence with cat researcher, Kristyn Vitale of Oregon State University.

Follow Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia and Emily Kwong @emilykwong1234. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez and edited by Viet Le.