Guinness World Records Certifies New World's Oldest Living Man Chitetsu Watanabe of Japan was born in 1907 — he's just shy of 113 years old. He raised bonsai trees in his spare time. He says his secret to old age is to always "keep a smile on your face."
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Guinness World Records Certifies New World's Oldest Living Man

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Guinness World Records Certifies New World's Oldest Living Man

Guinness World Records Certifies New World's Oldest Living Man

Guinness World Records Certifies New World's Oldest Living Man

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Chitetsu Watanabe of Japan was born in 1907 — he's just shy of 113 years old. He raised bonsai trees in his spare time. He says his secret to old age is to always "keep a smile on your face."

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Guinness World Records certified a new world's oldest man. His name is Chitetsu Watanabe of Japan. He was born in 1907. He is just shy of his 113th birthday. He served in the military, worked in agriculture. He raised bonsai trees in his spare time. He's got a sweet tooth. And since he lost his teeth, he prefers custard and cream puffs. He says his secret to old age is to always keep a smile on your face.

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