This Is Not A Drill: Active Shooter Training In Schools : 1A "School psychologists need to be brought in at the front end...what is the trauma history of some of the staff and the students? We need to know this," says school psychologist Melissa Reeves.

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This Is Not A Drill: Active Shooter Training In Schools

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This Is Not A Drill: Active Shooter Training In Schools

1A

This Is Not A Drill: Active Shooter Training In Schools

This Is Not A Drill: Active Shooter Training In Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/806714958/806717753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A student (R) engages a gunman over a mock shooting victim during a Tac*One Consulting "Lone Wolf" civilian active shooter response course for concealed weapons permit holders in Longmont, Colorado. Rick T. Wilking/Getty Images / Rick T. Wilking hide caption

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Rick T. Wilking/Getty Images / Rick T. Wilking

A student (R) engages a gunman over a mock shooting victim during a Tac*One Consulting "Lone Wolf" civilian active shooter response course for concealed weapons permit holders in Longmont, Colorado.

Rick T. Wilking/Getty Images / Rick T. Wilking

When shots ring out at a school, something has already gone very wrong: with guns, with mental health care and maybe with parenting. No matter the cause, tragedies in Parkland, Florida and Newtown, Connecticut and dozens of others bring trauma and fear to survivors.

And it's not surprising that schools across the nation are doing everything possible to be prepared for a possible shooting, including active shooter drills and lockdown exercises. And they often hire outside firms to conduct training and drills.

But a pair of teachers' unions now say the drills invoke anxiety and trauma in students. And in a world where school shootings are terrible, but rare, they say these exercises just aren't worth it.

Should schools reconsider active shooter drills? How do they affect the learning environment? Are they making schools safer?

Joining us to talk about these questions are Lexi Geoghegan, who is a senior at Princess Anne High School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, Evie Blad, education policy reporter at Education Week; Melissa Reeves, former president of the National Association of School Psychologists; and Joe Deedon, instructor at TAC*ONE consulting, a company that offers school and workplace active shooter training.

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