Demolition Project In Texas Doesn't Go As Planned An 11-story building in Dallas didn't implode all the way. The demolition company says it will finish the job soon — with a wrecking ball.
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Demolition Project In Texas Doesn't Go As Planned

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Demolition Project In Texas Doesn't Go As Planned

Demolition Project In Texas Doesn't Go As Planned

Demolition Project In Texas Doesn't Go As Planned

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An 11-story building in Dallas didn't implode all the way. The demolition company says it will finish the job soon — with a wrecking ball.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You've probably seen the photos - someone goes to Italy; they pose at the Leaning Tower of Pisa, positioned like they're holding up the landmark with brute strength. Well, a demolition in Texas did not go well this week, and now there is a leaning tower of Dallas. An 11-story building didn't implode all the way, and Texans are now taking leaning tower pictures right at home. Better hurry - the demolition company does say it's going to finish this job soon, with a wrecking ball.

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