Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh Wants You To Stop Telling Women To Smile : 1A "We've been socialized to be certain ways. I think a lot of men are performing a certain type of masculinity that they've been taught," Tatyana Fazlalizadeh says.

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Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh Wants You To Stop Telling Women To Smile

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Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh Wants You To Stop Telling Women To Smile

1A

Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh Wants You To Stop Telling Women To Smile

Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh Wants You To Stop Telling Women To Smile

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One of Tatyana Falalizadeh's pieces from "Stop Telling Women to Smile." Beth Parker PR hide caption

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Beth Parker PR

One of Tatyana Falalizadeh's pieces from "Stop Telling Women to Smile."

Beth Parker PR

Leering. Honking. Whistling. Cat-calling. Street harassment can be scary and dangerous for commuters every time they leave their homes. And it can be especially threatening for women commuters.

Street harassment complicates women's commutes to work, school, and every destination in between – but historically, not much has been done to protect commuters or make things safer.

Since 2012, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh has been working to change that, with her street art portrait series, Stop Telling Women to Smile. Fazlalizadeh is an artist, activist, and now the author of a new book of portraits and interviews with women who've experienced street harassment: Stop Telling Women to Smile: Stories of Street Harassment and How We're Taking Back Our Power.

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