The Indicator The Candidates Should Be Talking About : The Indicator from Planet Money Political Economist Jared Bernstein watched this week's Democratic debate. Many economic issues came up, but he thinks the candidates need to start talking about how much U.S. households are saving.
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The Indicator The Candidates Should Be Talking About

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The Indicator The Candidates Should Be Talking About

The Indicator The Candidates Should Be Talking About

The Indicator The Candidates Should Be Talking About

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/808289804/808294906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ethan Miller/Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - FEBRUARY 19: Democratic presidential candidates stand onstage at the start of the Democratic presidential primary debate in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The Democratic hopefuls duked it out in a fiery debate this week. Economic issues of all stripes came up, but political economist Jared Bernstein says the economic indicator he's been thinking about lately didn't come up at all: the savings rate for U.S. households. It's a lot higher than it has been in the past.

Nobody knows exactly why this is happening and though this could be considered a good thing, it might be a sign that people are worried about the future and too much savings could have a negative impact on the all important U.S. consumer spending. It also highlights some of the issues of inequality that many of the candidates have been talking about. Today on the show, we look into the household savings rate and why Jared thinks it's so important right now.

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