Grandmother Sinks Prize-Winning Putt At College Basketball Game Mary Ann Wakefield, who's in her 80s, had to make a long putt if she wanted to win a new car. The golf ball rolled 94 feet from one end of the court to the other. She nailed it.
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Grandmother Sinks Prize-Winning Putt At College Basketball Game

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Grandmother Sinks Prize-Winning Putt At College Basketball Game

Grandmother Sinks Prize-Winning Putt At College Basketball Game

Grandmother Sinks Prize-Winning Putt At College Basketball Game

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809161900/809161901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mary Ann Wakefield, who's in her 80s, had to make a long putt if she wanted to win a new car. The golf ball rolled 94 feet from one end of the court to the other. She nailed it.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Eighty-six-year old Mary Ann Wakefield stepped onto the court during a break in an Ole Miss basketball game in Mississippi. It was one of those gimmicks where she'd get a prize if she could sink a long golf putt.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: I'll tell you what, that's looking good. That's looking really good.

KING: The ball rolled 94 feet, from one end of the court to the other.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Ah, Ms. Mary Ann.

(CHEERING)

KING: She nailed it. The prize was a new car and a hug from the mascot Tony the Landshark.

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