Coronavirus: Your Questions Answered "Eighty percent of people who get COVID-19 recover in the same way you recover from a cold," says Dr. Leana Wen. "They don't go to the hospital. You feel bad for a few days and then you're back to normal."

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Coronavirus: Your Questions Answered

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Coronavirus: Your Questions Answered

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Coronavirus: Your Questions Answered

Coronavirus: Your Questions Answered

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People walk through Manhattan with surgical masks as fears of the coronavirus spreading through the U.S. increase. Spencer Platt/Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Spencer Platt/Getty Images

People walk through Manhattan with surgical masks as fears of the coronavirus spreading through the U.S. increase.

Spencer Platt/Spencer Platt/Getty Images

COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, continues to spread around the country. There are more than 150 cases of the virus in the United States, and at least 11 people have died. Both Washington and California have declared states of emergency.

The House has approved eight billion dollars of emergency funding to fight the virus – and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will now allow anyone who wants a coronavirus test to get one, if a doctor agrees.

The epidemic has set off a flurry of panic-buying around the world. Disinfecting wipes, face-masks, hand sanitizer, toilet paper – are all flying off the shelves.

But the CDC says, when it comes to America, the immediate health risk is actually pretty low.

So how do we balance legitimate concern with not...totally freaking out? How worried are you about the outbreak – and how worried should you be?

We answered your questions with Dr. Leana Wen, emergency physician and visiting professor at George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health; Dr. James Hamblin, medical doctor and staff writer for The Atlantic; and Dr. Anand Parekh, former deputy assistant secretary for health from 2008 to 2015.

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