Coronavirus And The Labor Market : Planet Money Today's healthy jobs report was uncontaminated by the coronavirus outbreak, but some parts of the labor market may be especially vulnerable in the months ahead.
NPR logo

Coronavirus And The Labor Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/813037776/813048405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Coronavirus And The Labor Market

Coronavirus And The Labor Market

Coronavirus And The Labor Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/813037776/813048405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Scott Olson/Getty Images
ELGIN, IL - JULY 16: Waitresses Gretchen Boren (L) and Michelle Enright wait on customers at an IHOP restaurant July 16, 2007 in Elgin, Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images

The U.S. economy added 273,000 jobs last month, and the unemployment rate fell to a very low 3.5 percent. However, because unemployment data is collected in the first half of the month, it means those healthy figures do not reflect the effects that coronavirus might be having on the labor market.

Today we talk with Martha Gimbel of Schmidt Futures about how the way the U.S. labor market is structured and has developed could make it vulnerable to a widespread coronavirus outbreak.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.