'Hood Feminism' Focuses on the Needs of the Many, Not the Few : 1A "We aren't seeing major marches for black women," author Mikki Kendall says. "We saw a lot of pink hats at the Women's March. Those numbers would've been great at a Black Lives Matter march or at Standing Rock."

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.
NPR logo

'Hood Feminism' Focuses on the Needs of the Many, Not the Few

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/813158828/813159704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
'Hood Feminism' Focuses on the Needs of the Many, Not the Few

1A

'Hood Feminism' Focuses on the Needs of the Many, Not the Few

'Hood Feminism' Focuses on the Needs of the Many, Not the Few

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/813158828/813159704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Demonstrators protest on the National Mall in Washington, DC, during the Women's March. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrators protest on the National Mall in Washington, DC, during the Women's March.

ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

This summer will mark 100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment—the amendment that guaranteed women the right to vote. And for the past hundred years the feminist movement has continued to advocate for the rights of women.

But that movement established its roots during the time of segregation. And racism within the movement continues to taint the way it represents and supports Black women in this country, says author and activist Mikki Kendall.

Her new book is called "Hood Feminism," and it explores how the traditional feminist movement has failed to include the struggles of black women in their fight for equality. And that the same exclusion of black women that operated in 1920 is still alive and well in feminism today.

Mikki Kendall talked with us about her critique of the current mainstream feminist movement and how she feels it's not serving the needs and rights of black women.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.