Coronavirus: All Work And No Play Prior to 2006, there was no mandated sick leave in the United States. "I believe it makes sense for all Americans to get sick pay and sick leave, not just those who are lucky to live in 13 states," says Aquent CEO John Chuang.

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Coronavirus: All Work And No Play

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Coronavirus: All Work And No Play

1A

Coronavirus: All Work And No Play

Coronavirus: All Work And No Play

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Customers wait in line to buy water and other supplies, on fears that the coronavirus, COVID-19, will spread and force people to stay indoors, at a Costco in Burbank, California. ROBYN BECK/ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Image hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Image

Customers wait in line to buy water and other supplies, on fears that the coronavirus, COVID-19, will spread and force people to stay indoors, at a Costco in Burbank, California.

ROBYN BECK/ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Image

The number of known coronavirus cases has passed 1,000 in the United States. And as public health experts keep reminding us, testing is lagging, so the actual number of infections is almost certainly much higher.

Last evening, at the White House, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci made it clear to Americans that mitigating coronavirus now means life needs to change.

Schools are closing, sports are being played to empty stadiums, meetings and conventions are being cancelled and businesses across the country are adapting to a new reality.

How does business change when staying apart is the best strategy? And what happens to workers when business, inevitably, slows down?

We talk about coronavirus and its impact on businesses large and small with Emanuele Nigro, owner of Osteria 57, an Italian restaurant in Manhattan, Pamela Loprest, senior fellow and labor economist in the Income and Benefits Policy Center at the Urban Institute, and John Chuang, CEO of Aquent, a creative staffing agency specializing in temporary work.

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