Outbreak Voices: How Coronavirus Is Affecting A Day Care Owner In Denver Marie Kelly, who owns a home day care in Denver, talks about how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting her.
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Outbreak Voices: How Coronavirus Is Affecting A Day Care Owner In Denver

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Outbreak Voices: How Coronavirus Is Affecting A Day Care Owner In Denver

Outbreak Voices: How Coronavirus Is Affecting A Day Care Owner In Denver

Outbreak Voices: How Coronavirus Is Affecting A Day Care Owner In Denver

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/815828851/815828852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Marie Kelly, who owns a home day care in Denver, talks about how the coronavirus outbreak is affecting her.

MARIE KELLY: I'm very nervous. I'm 70 next month. I've kind of cut my going to his grocery store down. I send my family members.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Americans, like Marie Kelly, are adjusting to a new normal as they try to stay healthy and limit the spread of coronavirus. Today on the show, we're hearing voices from across the country about how the coronavirus crisis is impacting people. Kelly runs a child care business out of her home in Denver. It's called Sunny Days. She says the outbreak has caused her to take extra precautions.

KELLY: I wash the kids' hands probably more than I should. I use a lot of hand sanitizer. I clean my rugs constantly. Every weekend I'm getting my rugs shampooed. I wash my dishes with Clorox included - just basically keeping every thing clean.

(SOUNDBITE OF PODINGTON BEAR'S "FALLING FALLING")

KELLY: I feel like I'm getting mixed messages. News is saying one thing - better to be safe than sorry, do this, do that, trying to help us. The government isn't really doing anything. I mean, people are going to need health care, no deductible. People are going to need food, everything. You just can't tell people to stay home. I don't see any preparedness at all. I don't see anybody making any plans for that.

(SOUNDBITE OF PODINGTON BEAR'S "FALLING FALLING")

KELLY: I have a pantry in one of my extra bedrooms - cereal, dry goods, beans, hand sanitizers, toilet paper, everything. Luckily I was stocked up because of the daycare. But the main worry - my kids in the day care and their families because if they're not coming to me, that means they're home.

(SOUNDBITE OF PODINGTON BEAR'S "FALLING FALLING")

KELLY: And they probably don't have pantries like I have. So I'm worried about them.

(SOUNDBITE OF PODINGTON BEAR'S "FALLING FALLING")

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Marie Kelly, owner of the Sunny Day daycare in Denver.

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