Coronavirus: The Prison Population "Too many people in our prisons and jails don't need to be there in the first place," Amy Fettig of the ACLU says. "We should be looking at who is in our prisons and jails and who can go home right now."

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Coronavirus: The Prison Population

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Coronavirus: The Prison Population

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Coronavirus: The Prison Population

Coronavirus: The Prison Population

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Inmates at the Cook County Jail line up to vote in the Illinois primary election after a polling place in the facility was officially opened for early voting on in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Inmates at the Cook County Jail line up to vote in the Illinois primary election after a polling place in the facility was officially opened for early voting on in Chicago, Illinois.

Scott Olson/Scott Olson/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control now recommends Americans avoid all gatherings with 50 persons or more. All across the country, communal spaces and events are getting postponed or shut down.

But so far, prisons and jails around the country won't be closing.

More than 2.2 million Americans are behind bars right now. They and prison staff are uniquely vulnerable to coronavirus if it spreads to their facility.

There are major concerns about whether our jails and prisons are doing enough to prepare for an outbreak to protect people on the inside.

But first, Politico's Dan Diamond gave us the latest updates on what Congress and the Trump administration are doing to respond to the crisis.

Lauren Weber, midwestern correspondent for Kaiser Health News, Dr. Homer Venters, the former chief medical officer for New York City's Correctional Health Services and Amy Fettig, deputy director for the ACLU's National Prison Project joined us for our conversation on how prisons are responding to COVID-19.

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