Working From Home : Planet Money Millions of people all across the world are now having to work from home. Including team Indicator. Today, a look at how this might change the way we work... and what it's like to skip the office.
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Working From Home

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Working From Home

Working From Home

Working From Home

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/817431664/817443131" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Indicator team is working from home, and so is the Indi-gator. Stacey Vanek Smith /NPR hide caption

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Stacey Vanek Smith /NPR

The Indicator team is working from home, and so is the Indi-gator.

Stacey Vanek Smith /NPR

Team Indicator is working from home, along with millions of people across the world. And while we don't miss the commute to the office, and we generally like working in our PJs, we're also dealing with all the issues that everyone else who has been asked (or told) to WFH are encountering: tech problems, lack of connectivity to coworkers, isolation and loneliness... not to mention the constant siren's song of Netflix and ice cream.

Sure, it's all fine for a few weeks, but social distancing and remote working could go on for months. And that could have huge implications for the US workplace and for workers themselves going forward. On today's show, working from home (#WFH), and what it might mean for the future of American work.

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