A Potential CRISPR Breakthrough For Blindness It's no exaggeration to say the gene-editing technique CRISPR could revolutionize medicine. We look at a new milestone — a CRISPR treatment that edits a patient's DNA while it's still inside their body. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein explains how, if this treatment works, it could open up new avenues of treatment for diseases, like a genetic form of blindness, that were previously off limits to CRISPR.
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Yep. They Injected CRISPR Into An Eyeball

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Yep. They Injected CRISPR Into An Eyeball

Yep. They Injected CRISPR Into An Eyeball

Yep. They Injected CRISPR Into An Eyeball

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/817811768/817893109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
ilbusca/Getty Images
Antique illustration of human body anatomy: Human eye
ilbusca/Getty Images

It's no exaggeration to say the gene-editing technique CRISPR could revolutionize medicine. We look at a new milestone — a CRISPR treatment that edits a patient's DNA while it's still inside their body. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein explains how, if this treatment works, it could open up new avenues of treatment for diseases, like a genetic form of blindness, that were previously off limits to CRISPR.

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This episode was produced by Brit Hanson and edited by Viet Le.