China's New Normal : Planet Money China appears to have stopped the spread of coronavirus within its borders. People there are now beginning to adjust to a new normal.
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China's New Normal

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China's New Normal

China's New Normal

China's New Normal

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 14: A Chinese woman has her temperature checked by a security guard before entering a shopping area on March 14, 2020 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Here in the United States, governments, corporations and individuals are focused on trying to control the spread of coronavirus. Offices, bars and restaurants have closed, local government facilities have shut down and people are practising social distancing, staying at home and restricting interaction with others. The result is a kind of lockdown in many parts of the country, colored by uncertainty around how long it might take to stop the spread of coronavirus and return the economy to normal operations.

In other parts of the world, countries are beginning to emerge from the dark tunnel of coronavirus. China was the location of the original outbreak, but it appears to have stopped the spread of the virus within its borders by locking down entire regions, restricting travel and enforcing strict quarantines. People living in China are now adjusting to a new normal. Today we speak to Dan Wang, who works for an economic research firm in Beijing, to find out what life is like there today.

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