Why The Coronavirus Spreads So Easily : Short Wave Ed Yong rounds up some theories in a recent article for The Atlantic. He tells host Maddie Sofia one reason the virus spreads so well might have to do with an enzyme commonly found in human tissue.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Why Is The Coronavirus So Good At Spreading?

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Why Is The Coronavirus So Good At Spreading?

Why Is The Coronavirus So Good At Spreading?

Why Is The Coronavirus So Good At Spreading?

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This undated handout photo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a microscopic view of the Coronavirus at the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia. Getty Images hide caption

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This undated handout photo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a microscopic view of the Coronavirus at the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Ed Yong rounds up some theories in a recent article for The Atlantic. He tells host Maddie Sofia one reason the virus spreads so well might have to do with an enzyme commonly found in human tissue.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, edited by Viet Le, and fact-checked by Emily Vaughn.