Formula One Drivers Turn To The Internet To Wait Out Pandemic Since the real-world Grand Prix series is on hold, drivers revved up their engines in the video game version of Formula One. They plan to hold online races every week as fans tune in.
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Formula One Drivers Turn To The Internet To Wait Out Pandemic

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Formula One Drivers Turn To The Internet To Wait Out Pandemic

Formula One Drivers Turn To The Internet To Wait Out Pandemic

Formula One Drivers Turn To The Internet To Wait Out Pandemic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/820542955/820542956" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Since the real-world Grand Prix series is on hold, drivers revved up their engines in the video game version of Formula One. They plan to hold online races every week as fans tune in.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Formula One race drivers turned to the Internet while waiting out the pandemic. Since the real-world Grand Prix Series is on hold, drivers revved up their engines in the video game version. They plan to hold online races every week as fans tune in. As the racing organization notes, there are many advantages to the virtual track. The chances of serious injury are much lower - as long as you do not count carpal tunnel syndrome.

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