The Coronavirus Is Deadlier Than The Flu. How Else Do They Differ? President Trump has compared the coronavirus to the seasonal flu. NPR reporter Pien Huang speaks to host Maddie Sofia about why the coronavirus appears deadlier and more transmissible — and why it poses such a risk to our healthcare system.

Here's Pien's story.
Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
NPR logo

No, The Coronavirus Isn't Another Flu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/821337522/822250155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
No, The Coronavirus Isn't Another Flu

No, The Coronavirus Isn't Another Flu

No, The Coronavirus Isn't Another Flu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/821337522/822250155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(At left) A colorized electron micrograph image of the influenza virus. (At right) Color-enhanced electron micrograph image of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient. Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Source

(At left) A colorized electron micrograph image of the influenza virus. (At right) Color-enhanced electron micrograph image of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient.

Science Source

President Trump has compared the coronavirus to the seasonal flu. NPR reporter Pien Huang speaks to host Maddie Sofia about why the coronavirus appears deadlier and more transmissible — and why it poses such a risk to our healthcare system.

Here's Pien's story.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, fact-checked by Emily Vaughn, and edited by Viet Le.