Bernie Krause and Soundscape Ecology : Invisibilia Bernie Krause was a successful musician as a young man, playing with rock stars like Jim Morrison and George Harrison in the 1960s and '70s. But then one day, Bernie heard a sound unlike anything he'd ever encountered and it completely overtook his life. He quit the music business to pursue it and has spent the last 50 years following it all over the earth. And what he's heard raises this question: what can we learn about ourselves and the world around us if we quiet down and listen? | To learn more about this episode, subscribe to our newsletter. Click here to learn more about NPR sponsors.
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The Last Sound

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The Last Sound

The Last Sound

The Last Sound

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Artwork by Leonardo Santamaria. Leonardo Santamaria for NPR hide caption

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Leonardo Santamaria for NPR

Artwork by Leonardo Santamaria.

Leonardo Santamaria for NPR

Bernie Krause was a successful musician as a young man, playing with rock stars like Jim Morrison and George Harrison in the 1960s and '70s. But then one day, Bernie heard a sound unlike anything he'd ever encountered and it completely overtook his life. He quit the music business to pursue it and has spent the last 50 years following it all over the earth. And what he's heard raises this question: what can we learn about ourselves and the world around us if we quiet down and listen?

Special thanks to the following musicians:

Yung Kartz - "So Gone"

Correction April 17, 2020

In a previous version of this podcast, we referenced a song by Brazilian rapper Emicida but mistakenly played a song by a different Brazilian musician.