Loss Of Smell Or Taste Emerges As Possible Precursor To Some COVID-19 Cases A team of British doctors, citing anecdotal evidence from around the world, believe that losing the senses of smell or taste may be symptoms of contracting the new coronavirus.

Loss Of Smell Or Taste Emerges As Possible Precursor To Some COVID-19 Cases

Loss Of Smell Or Taste Emerges As Possible Precursor To Some COVID-19 Cases

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A team of British doctors, citing anecdotal evidence from around the world, believe that losing the senses of smell or taste may be symptoms of contracting the new coronavirus.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Common symptoms of COVID-19 include a high fever and shortness of breath.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

But losing your sense of smell and taste - well, a team of British doctors citing anecdotal evidence from around the world believe that these might also be symptoms.

CHANG: They say people who suddenly can't smell or taste may want to self-isolate for a week, even if they have no other symptoms.

SHAPIRO: So if you can't smell the curry cooking on your stove...

CHANG: Or the cup of coffee right under your nose...

SHAPIRO: ...You might be an unknown carrier of the coronavirus.

CHANG: And you might want to stay home. It's what the doctor ordered.

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