Poultry Supplier Says Baby Chick Sales Are Way Up With Easter coming up and housebound Americans missing the sights of spring, new bird owners hoping to supplement their pantries should be aware — chicks don't start laying eggs for several months.

Poultry Supplier Says Baby Chick Sales Are Way Up

Poultry Supplier Says Baby Chick Sales Are Way Up

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With Easter coming up and housebound Americans missing the sights of spring, new bird owners hoping to supplement their pantries should be aware — chicks don't start laying eggs for several months.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. We've heard all the stories about people hoarding toilet paper, right? Well, there is another soft, fluffy item literally flying off the shelves, baby chickens. With Easter coming and housebound Americans missing the sights of spring, poultry suppliers say chick sales are way up. New bird owners hoping to supplement their pantries should be aware, though, chicks don't start laying eggs for several months. But they do start being cute immediately.

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