Why Are Bees Dying? It's Not What You Might Think : Short Wave A deadly triangle of factors is killing off U.S. honeybees. Last year, forty percent of honeybee colonies died in the U.S., continuing an alarming trend. Entomologist Sammy Ramsey tells host Maddie Sofia about the "three P's" and what listeners can do to help our fuzzy-flighted friends.
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Honeybees Need Your Help, Honey

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Honeybees Need Your Help, Honey

Honeybees Need Your Help, Honey

Honeybees Need Your Help, Honey

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/825305756/825635387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Soteavy Som / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm
Honeybees on honeycomb
Soteavy Som / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Honeybees sweeten the U.S. economy to the tune of eighteen billion dollars per year in pollination services. But a triangle of factors has been killing honeybee colonies.

USDA entomologist Sammy Ramsey — aka Doctor Buggs — tells host Maddie Sofia about the "three P's" that are driving these die-offs. And how our industrious friends the bees actually love it when we're a little lazy with our yard work.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Emily Vaughn and Brit Hanson, and edited by Viet Le.