WeChats From The Future Of The Coronavirus She felt the urgency before her husband did. A story about the time lag between the arrival of the coronavirus in two different nations, and how that played out in a marriage
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WeChats From The Future

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WeChats From The Future

WeChats From The Future

WeChats From The Future

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A gloved passenger holds her phone on a subway train in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on March 28. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

A gloved passenger holds her phone on a subway train in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on March 28.

Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

In late January, the mysterious viral pneumonia that had struck Liying's hometown of Wuhan seemed like nothing more than a distant headline to most in her Connecticut community. Only her online chat groups of local Chinese-Americans, who were sourcing and organizing supplies to send to China, seemed to understand her fear. Even her husband didn't get why a busy working mom spent so many late nights buying up masks and obsessing over the news.

But all that was about to change.

On this week's episode of Rough Translation, the story of one couple sharing a home, yet separated by 5000 miles of understanding. We explore what that taught them about themselves, their marriage and why we all find it so difficult to measure the distance between ourselves and danger.

You can find more episodes of Rough Translation on our homepage, or wherever you get your podcasts.

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