Coronavirus: When Staying Home Isn't Safe "The second a hand is raised? That's abuse. The second you're not allowed to do what you want to do? That's abuse. And a lot of people don't understand that," says retired detective Bob Wile.

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Coronavirus: When Staying Home Isn't Safe

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Coronavirus: When Staying Home Isn't Safe

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Coronavirus: When Staying Home Isn't Safe

Coronavirus: When Staying Home Isn't Safe

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A picture taken in Chatillon, south of Paris shows a view on the garden at the centre d'hebergement et de reinsertion sociale (CHRS), a shelter dedicated to women victims of domestic violence, run by SOS Femmes alternative NGO. MARTIN BUREAU/MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MARTIN BUREAU/MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images

A picture taken in Chatillon, south of Paris shows a view on the garden at the centre d'hebergement et de reinsertion sociale (CHRS), a shelter dedicated to women victims of domestic violence, run by SOS Femmes alternative NGO.

MARTIN BUREAU/MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images

About 90 percent of the United States has been ordered to stay at home for at least a few weeks—maybe even a few months. Health officials say it's the safest place for us.

But that's not true for people experiencing domestic violence.

An average of 24 Americans per minute are victims of rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner, according to the National Domestic Violence Hotline. That's more than 12 million women and men over the course of a year.

And now that we're all being told to stay home, many of us are seeing more of our neighbors than we ever have before. What should you do if you suspect someone is being hurt?

To help us talk about this, we spoke with Crystal Justice, from the National Domestic Violence Hotline, Maisha Colter, CEO of Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse in Texas and Bob Wile, a retired police detective who trains law enforcement on responding to domestic violence calls.

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National Domestic Violence Hotline

Trained advocates are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 to talk confidentially with anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship.

Call 1-800-799-7233 or click here.