Tiger At Zoo Contracts Coronavirus, Raising Questions About Household Pets A Malaysian tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City tested positive for the coronavirus in what is known to be the first animal infected in the United States. Does that mean anything for your pets?
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Tiger At Zoo Contracts Coronavirus, Raising Questions About Household Pets

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Tiger At Zoo Contracts Coronavirus, Raising Questions About Household Pets

Tiger At Zoo Contracts Coronavirus, Raising Questions About Household Pets

Tiger At Zoo Contracts Coronavirus, Raising Questions About Household Pets

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/828303831/828303832" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A Malaysian tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City tested positive for the coronavirus in what is known to be the first animal infected in the United States. Does that mean anything for your pets?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

On Sunday, New York City reported a rather unusual case of COVID-19.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo has tested positive for the coronavirus.

KELLY: According to the zoo, the 4-year-old tiger named Nadia appeared to be visibly sick with a dry cough by March 27.

SHAPIRO: While only Nadia has been tested, six other big cats at the zoo are also showing symptoms.

KELLY: So yeah, animals can get the coronavirus. And it's not a jump to ask, what if our pets get it - our pets?

SHAPIRO: Well, the USDA says there is no evidence yet that animals can spread the virus to people. And it is not recommending routine testing of animals.

KELLY: But you should wash your hands after petting your dogs, your cats, ferrets, hamsters and so on.

SHAPIRO: And as for whether we can give the coronavirus to our pets...

KELLY: The American Veterinary Medical Association and the CDC have recommended you can never be too careful.

SHAPIRO: So if you suspect you might have COVID-19, it is best to limit contact with your furry friends.

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