What Do Coronavirus Models Say About When To Reopen? : Short Wave Scientific models of disease don't predict the future. They're just one tool to help us all prepare for it. NPR global health correspondent Nurith Aizenman explains how scientific models of disease are built and how they're used by public health experts. We also look at one influential model forecasting when individual states might begin to reopen.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Coronavirus Models Aren't "Wrong." That's Not How They Work.

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Coronavirus Models Aren't "Wrong." That's Not How They Work.

Coronavirus Models Aren't "Wrong." That's Not How They Work.

Coronavirus Models Aren't "Wrong." That's Not How They Work.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/833337645/837453967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Response coordinator for White House Coronavirus Task Force Deborah Birx, on March 31, points to a graphic displaying data from the IHME model, one of several models public health officials are using to help make decisions about the pandemic. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Response coordinator for White House Coronavirus Task Force Deborah Birx, on March 31, points to a graphic displaying data from the IHME model, one of several models public health officials are using to help make decisions about the pandemic.

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Scientific models of disease don't predict the future. They're just one tool to help us all prepare for it. NPR global health correspondent Nurith Aizenman explains how scientific models of disease are built and how they're used by public health experts. We also look at one influential model forecasting when individual states might begin to reopen.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, edited by Andrea Kissack, and fact-checked by Emily Vaughn.