The Science Behind How to Bake Bread : Short Wave Social distancing has some of us taking up bread baking for the first time, including host Maddie Sofia. Chemist and baker Patricia Christie explains the science of making bread, including a few tips for when things go wrong with your bread dough. And she offers some advice for first-time bakers everywhere.
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The Science of Making Bread

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The Science of Making Bread

The Science of Making Bread

The Science of Making Bread

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Host Maddie Sofia tries her hand at baking sourdough. She says this loaf looked pretty, but "tasted like feet." Maddie Sofia/Maddie Sofia hide caption

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Maddie Sofia/Maddie Sofia

Host Maddie Sofia tries her hand at baking sourdough. She says this loaf looked pretty, but "tasted like feet."

Maddie Sofia/Maddie Sofia

Social distancing has some of us taking up bread baking for the first time, including host Maddie Sofia. Chemist and baker Patricia Christie explains the science of making bread, including a few tips for when things go wrong with your bread dough. And she offers some advice for first-time bakers everywhere.

Follow Maddie Sofia on Twitter. Email us at shortwave@npr.org.