The Story So Far : Planet Money Five indicators provide a gauge of how daily economic life in America has changed.
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The Story So Far

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The Story So Far

The Story So Far

The Story So Far

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ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images
View of an almost empty Time Square on April 03, 2020 in New York. - In New York, the epicenter of the US outbreak, Mayor Bill de Blasio urged residents to cover their faces when outside and Vice President Mike Pence said there would be a recommendation on the use of masks by the general public in the next few days. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images)
ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

There's some talk that the growth rate of COVID-19 infections may have peaked in the U.S. But that doesn't mean the economy has bottomed.

We look at five indicators that give us an idea of how the economy is doing right now — some of which tell stories that are not receiving enough attention just yet.

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