Buzzkill : Throughline In the whole of human history, no predator has killed more of us than the lowly mosquito. And this killing spree, which we still struggle in vain to stop, means the mosquito has been an outsized force in our history — from altering the fate of empires to changing our DNA. This week, three stories of the quiet legacy and the potential future of the mosquito.
NPR logo

Buzzkill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/835271594/856212157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Buzzkill

Buzzkill

Buzzkill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/835271594/856212157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the whole of human history, no predator has killed more of us than the lowly mosquito. And this killing spree, which we still struggle in vain to stop, means the mosquito has been an outsized force in our history — from altering the fate of empires to changing our DNA. This week, three stories of the quiet legacy and the potential future of the mosquito.


If you would like to read more on the topic, here's a list:


Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

We love to hear from our listeners! Tweet at us @throughlineNPR, send us an email, or leave us a voicemail at (872) 588-8805.