Contact Tracing Of Coronavirus Cases Is Key For Reopening The U.S. may need 100,000 people trained in the public health practice of contact tracing — tracking and isolating people who've been in contact with someone who tests positive for the coronavirus. NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin explains how it works, and why it's a key part of the fight against the pandemic.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Contact Tracing Is Key To Reopening. We're Not There Yet

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Contact Tracing Is Key To Reopening. We're Not There Yet

Contact Tracing Is Key To Reopening. We're Not There Yet

Contact Tracing Is Key To Reopening. We're Not There Yet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/839776168/843393146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Government workers demonstrate Singapore's new contact-tracing smarthphone app called TraceTogether, which uses Bluetooth technology. Apple and Google are developing a similar system. Catherine Lai/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Catherine Lai/AFP via Getty Images

Government workers demonstrate Singapore's new contact-tracing smarthphone app called TraceTogether, which uses Bluetooth technology. Apple and Google are developing a similar system.

Catherine Lai/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. may need 100,000 people trained in the public health practice of contact tracing — tracking and isolating people who've been in contact with someone who tests positive for the coronavirus. NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin explains how it works, and why it's a key part of the fight against the pandemic.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, fact-checked by Emily Vaughn and edited by Viet Le.