How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design : Short Wave We're all spending more time these days at home — including our bathrooms. But why do they look the way they do? From toilets to toothbrush holders, bioethicist and journalist Elizabeth Yuko explains how infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza shaped American bathroom design. And, we explore how the current pandemic could inspire a new wave of innovation in the bathroom.
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How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design

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How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design

How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design

How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design

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An illustration of an American home bathroom from 1884 J.L. Mott Iron Works/New York Public Library hide caption

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J.L. Mott Iron Works/New York Public Library

An illustration of an American home bathroom from 1884

J.L. Mott Iron Works/New York Public Library

We're all spending more time these days at home — including our bathrooms. But why do they look the way they do? From toilets to toothbrush holders, bioethicist and journalist Elizabeth Yuko explains how infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza have shaped American bathroom design. And, we explore how the current pandemic could inspire a new wave of innovation in the bathroom.

Read Elizabeth's original reporting here:

This episode was produced by Brit Hanson, edited by Viet Le, and fact-checked by Emily Vaughn.