Fitbit: James Park In 2006, James Park had what he describes as a "lightning bolt" moment when he first used a Nintendo Wii. Fascinated by its motion-tracking controller, James wondered if you could take the technology out of the living room and into the streets. Three years later, he and co-founder Eric Friedman launched the Fitbit Tracker, which allowed users to track their steps and compare progress with others. Sales took off, and Fitbit dominated the wearables market until the Apple Watch came along, forcing James and Eric to re-imagine the brand. Today, against a cloudy economic backdrop, James hopes Fitbit can grow into its role as a health and wellness service.
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Fitbit: James Park

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Fitbit: James Park

Fitbit: James Park

Fitbit: James Park

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/841267648/844093325" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Illustration of Fitbit's founder James Park. Karina Perez for NPR hide caption

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Karina Perez for NPR

Illustration of Fitbit's founder James Park.

Karina Perez for NPR

In 2006, James Park had what he describes as a "lightning bolt" moment when he first used a Nintendo Wii.

Fascinated by its motion-tracking controller, James wondered if you could take the technology out of the living room and into the streets.

Three years later, he and co-founder Eric Friedman launched the Fitbit Tracker, which allowed users to track their steps and compare progress with others.

Sales took off, and Fitbit dominated the wearables market until the Apple Watch came along, forcing James and Eric to re-imagine the brand.

Today, against a cloudy economic backdrop, James hopes Fitbit can grow into its role as a health and wellness service.