U.S. oil prices went negative. What does that mean for the economy? : Planet Money On Monday, the price of a barrel of oil in the United States fell to negative $37. That's never happened before. What's going on with the price of oil? | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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Negative Oil

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Negative Oil

Negative Oil

Negative Oil

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All pipelines lead to Cushing. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

All pipelines lead to Cushing.

Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

This past Monday, the price of a barrel of oil in the United States fell below zero. Specifically, it fell to negative $37 a barrel. This is not normal; it has never happened before. Until a few days ago, it didn't even seem possible.

Today on the show: What just happened to the price of oil, and what does it tell us about the world?

Music: "Nightrider," "Casa Loma," and "Kick Back Relax."

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