Coronavirus: The Urban-Rural Divide : It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Depending on where you live, your race, and your income, the coronavirus pandemic can look dramatically different. Sam's NPR colleagues, Leila Fadel, based in Los Angeles, California, and Kirk Siegler, based in Boise, Idaho, compare how differently rural and urban populations are dealing with the pandemic and what they may have in common. Then, Sam speaks with a listener who had COVID-19 and thinks she may have passed it on to a co-worker who later died. And listeners share all the things helping them cope and getting them through this time.
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Coronavirus: The Great Equalizer — Or Maybe Not

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Coronavirus: The Great Equalizer — Or Maybe Not

Coronavirus: The Great Equalizer — Or Maybe Not

Coronavirus: The Great Equalizer — Or Maybe Not

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/843341366/844793322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These images depict high traffic locations that are currently deserted because of Stay-at-Home order in Los Angeles. Robert LeBlanc/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert LeBlanc/Getty Images

These images depict high traffic locations that are currently deserted because of Stay-at-Home order in Los Angeles.

Robert LeBlanc/Getty Images

The U.S. is leading the world in growing coronavirus cases and depending on which part of the country you're in, your race, and your income, the situation could look drastically different. Sam is joined by two NPR colleagues, both in very different cities. Leila Fadel, based in Los Angeles, and Kirk Siegler, based in Boise, Idaho, compare how differently rural and urban populations are dealing with the pandemic and what they may have in common. Then, Sam speaks with a listener who had COVID-19 and thinks she may have passed it on to a co-worker who later died.