The coronavirus could cause record bankruptcy filings : The Indicator from Planet Money The COVID-19 pandemic is driving thousands of people and businesses into bankruptcy.
NPR logo

The Bankruptcy Question

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/846756651/846763414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Bankruptcy Question

The Bankruptcy Question

The Bankruptcy Question

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/846756651/846763414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images
A view of a courthouse during a sentencing hearing for Marcel Lehel Lazar, a hacker known as Guccifer, at the Albert V. Bryan US federal courthouse September 1, 2016 in Alexandria, Virginia.(Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Filing for bankruptcy is public. For companies, it can be almost routine: for individuals, it can feel confusing, isolating and scary. For many people there's a real stigma attached to going bankrupt.

But for many Americans, bankruptcy is beginning to look like the only option. We talk to one woman whose income has dropped to zero because of the coronavirus pandemic, and who is now considering bankruptcy as her best financial option.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.